Exact Editions – IDPD17

This year brings us the inaugural International Digital Preservation Day, organised by the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) and supported by digital preservation networks, institutions and universities world-wide. The commendable drive behind IDPD17 is to encourage institutions and individuals to celebrate resources which have been preserved and to encourage initiatives to be taken for the future.

Exact Editions works to build, preserve and deliver complete online archives for libraries and individual subscribers. The aim is to make every magazine on the platform fully searchable, easy to access and as readable as the print version, serving to secure objects of cultural importance for future generations.

To read more about the cultural importance of magazines, and why they should be preserved, take a look at this post: https://blog.exacteditions.com/2017/11/28/preserving-magazines/

The digitisation of an archive involves numerous challenges such as; creating a fluid platform on which to view the archive and maintaining a perfect digital standard through quality control. At Exact Editions the production team has mastered this process so that thousands of pages are now safe, saved from their perilous paper existence.

To see all the work which goes into digitising an archive, look out for our forthcoming blog to be released on digital preservation day!

When we heard about IDPD17, Exact Editions, and our publishing partners, were very keen to join the digital celebration — and we know you can’t turn up to a digital preservation party without bringing your own bytes to eat. So in the spirit of this digital fiesta we’ve opened up 36 issues to the public for a one month period. Twelve of our publisher partners have kindly allowed us to open three issues from their beautiful magazines.

You can browse these windows into cultural history here: https://institutions.exacteditions.com/showcases/idpd2017

Every single page, issue, year, decade and archive is fully searchable by keyword on the Exact Editions platform. So make sure to explore the free issues in their entirety and have fun with the platform. For example; the 1999 issue of New Internationalist which covers the Radical Twentieth Century surely must mention Che Guevara, right?

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Search results for ‘Che Guevara’ in the January 1999 issue of New Internationalist

Make the most of our easy-to-use toolbar which is located at the bottom of every page on the website. Share your favourite pages on social media channels, and be sure to follow us on Twitter and tag us in any pages which catch your eye!

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Moonlight feature from the March 2017 issue of Sight & Sound

Jokes and freebies aside, Digital Preservation is a potent issue in the modern world. We have the unprecedented opportunity to preserve our history and culture for the future, and Exact Editions is proud to participate in an event dedicated to crystallising our digital legacy.

If you want to hear more from us, follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/exacteditions

To see what other magazines we work with, visit our shop pages:

Individual Shop: https://shop.exacteditions.com/ 
Institutional Shop: https://institutions.exacteditions.com/

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The Wire Archive Live

As of today, every single issue of The Wire since it kicked off in 1982 is available digitally. That’s 353 issues and 25,0000 pages of experimental music history, over 30 years, all available on the iPad/iPhone app or online. Imagine the entirety of The Wire’s history at your fingertips.

Wire Homepage

If you’ll kindly pick your jaws up off the floor, we can tell you that the whole lot is fully searchable, too. So if there’s a specific artist, group or review you’re after – no matter how obscure – look no further.

Say, for example, you’re dying to find the first time Andrew Weatherall made an appearance in The Wire. You can not only find every single mention of him, you can bookmark your search to come back to later, and you can tweet it directly from the app.

Andrew Weatherall

You can trace musical history through its pages, and search the gadgets which have shaped the way we listen to it. Like the iPod.

If you search for ‘iPod’, you’ll find the first mention is a letter entitled

‘iPod, therefore I hate music’ (May 2004)

Written in response to a comment on the ‘smug fraternity of iPod ownership’ then emerging, the incensed reader claims that ‘by the very act of transferring a CD to a hard disk, iPod users reveal themselves to be no lovers of music.’ Would we still say that’s true? I doubt it!

By July 2012, we see the iPod popping up in a review of ‘Shuffle Culture’ at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, which showcased a ‘conceptual revue of [Ahmir ‘Questlove’ Thompson’s] iPod playlist’ and its ‘emblematically postmodern’ bringing together of contrasting artists.

Other turns in the tide of musical thought include finger-pointing towards Spotify as responsible for the ‘decline of the album as a self-contained artwork’, in October 2009. By October 2012, Spotify was being credited with ‘stimulal[ing] an interest in an extraordinarily wide appreciation of music’.

We’ve only just begun to flex the muscles of this powerful new tool for music lovers. Why not have a go yourself, and see what you can unearth?

The Wire Colourful